In Enzo's Splendid Gardens
In Enzo's Splendid Gardens

Follow Shrek, a not-so-conventional ogre, on his quest to find and marry a princess.
Have each student cut out a copy of the castle tower patterns. Then guide her to arrange the pieces in order, placing the first event at the tower’s base. When the events are in the correct order, the letters on the right side of the tower spell the witch’s magic words. Have each child glue her pieces together and take her tower home to share Shrek’s story.


Growing Vegetable Soup
Growing Vegetable Soup


Jeffrey Lionel Magee, an orphan from Hollidaysburg, runs away to Two Mills, a town divided by race. His speed, bravery, and incredible feats earn him the nickname Maniac. Maniac’s gentle ways help the people of Two Mills begin to understand and accept each other.
Here’s an interactive display that gives students practice identifying character traits. Make three copies of the shoe patterns and label each of the six shoes with a different type of information readers can learn about a character. Post the shoes on a board titled “Step by Step Character Analysis” and attach a length of yarn to each one as a dangling shoestring. As you read, guide students to record on index cards the details that help describe Maniac Magee and then staple the cards on the board along the correct

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A Gentle Giant

Citing Evidence




For this activity, have each student cut out the crocodile pattern. Next, have the child label one side of the crocodile “Fierce” and the other “Gentle.” Then guide the student to read the selection “A Gentle Brute” and list under each adjective words, phrases, and ideas from the selection that support that description. When he finishes, each child folds his pattern as shown and tapes its base to make it stand. Then the student chooses the adjective he believes best describes a Nile crocodile. He writes a letter to persuade you that a Nile crocodile is fierce or gentle and uses his notes to cite evidence from the selection.


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Sam-I-Am, a cheerful optimist, tries to convince his doubtful friend to eat green eggs and ham. His persistence pays off when his friend finally takes a bite and discovers he likes green eggs and ham.
For this partner activity, cut apart a copy of the game cards and gameboard. Put each game card inside a plastic egg and store the eggs in a bag. To play, each partner selects an egg and opens it. If the game card is a ham, the player keeps the card and sets the empty egg aside. If the game card is half an egg, the player reads the contraction, matches it to the correct words on the gameboard, and sets the empty egg aside. The partners continue playing in this manner until all the contractions are matched. The player with fewer ham cards wins. As time allows, students play again.
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Want to check students’ reading comprehension after independent reading or class read-aloud sessions? Try this! Make a class supply of “About Today’s Reading” and keep the pages handy. Then periodically end a reading session by guiding each child to follow the directions on the page, sharing her thoughts and letting you know she was on task!
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L.2.1f


Produce compound sentences.


Wrap up the end of the year with this sunny activity. Lead students in a discussion of the things they will miss most about school. Next, guide the class to discuss the things they are most looking forward to this summer. Then have each child copy and complete the sentence frame shown. Guide him to trim a yellow piece of construction paper into a sun shape; then have him write and illustrate his sentence on the cutout. Provide time for students to share their sentences aloud.
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Say What?


L.3.2c


Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.


In advance, copy and cut apart the punctuation mark cards. Next, write on four paper strips sentences like the ones shown, leaving spaces for the punctuation cards. Then place the strips in a pocket chart or along the board’s edge. Read the first sentence aloud; then invite a student to paper-clip the corresponding cards to the strip. After confirming the answer, direct the child to remove the cards. Then repeat with the remaining sentences. As an alternative, put magnetic tape on the back of each card and write the sentences on the board. Have students place the magnetic cards in the appropriate places.