One Slice at a Time
W.3.3

Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.


To begin, each child writes on a copy of the pizza pie pattern the name of his story’s main character and the problem the character will face. Next, the student cuts apart the pie slices. On each slice labeled “Event,” he writes a brief description of an important story event. He writes a conclusion on the remaining slice. The student organizes the slices so the events are ordered in a clockwise manner, as shown. Then he numbers each event and glues the pie to a sheet of paper. Finally, the student uses the pie organizer to write his narrative story.



Beautiful Butterflies



W.2.3





Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.





To prepare, put small amounts of paint in shallow containers. A child cuts out one of the butterfly patterns and traces it on white or light-colored construction paper. Then she cuts out the tracing and decorates it by making thumbprints with the paint. She continues painting until she achieves a desired effect. While the paint dries, the child writes on the butterfly pattern a narrative story about a short sequence of events. Then she glues the story onto the back of her painting.



book cover
book cover
Handsprings
Handsprings


Explore the magnificent and the muddy ingredients that make up spring with this collection of energetic poetry!
For a quick poetry-writing lesson, read aloud the poem “Ten Things to Do When It Rains” and have students identify each couplet. Next, lead them to brainstorm a list of things to do when it rains. Jot each activity on the board with space below it. Then guide students to brainstorm a rhyming activity for each listed item. To follow up, have each child choose and illustrate a couplet about things to do when it rains. Display the completed pages with the title “It’s Raining; It’s Pouring! What Should We Do?”
idea
idea


The True Story of the Three Little Pigs
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs


Is Alexander T. Wolf really a big, bad wolf, or was his reputation ruined by three little pigs? Listen to A. Wolf’s side of the story and then decide for yourself.
After reading the story, lead students to list traits that describe Alexander T. Wolf. Then review each trait, guiding students to decide whether there is direct evidence of the trait in the story or there are hints that lead students to make that inference. Next, have each student choose one of the wolf’s traits. On a 4¼" x 11" piece of paper, have the child describe the trait, cite evidence or explain the inference that supports the description, and illustrate it. Then collect students’ pages and bind them together in a class book titled “All About A. Wolf.”


Categories for Canines



Ensure subject-verb agreement.


L.3.1f



idea
idea




First, cut apart the mat and sentence cards; then place them at a center. A student reads each sentence and determines if the subject and verb agree. If they do, he places the card on the dog. If they do not agree, he places the card on the doghouse. After he has sorted all the cards, he refers to theanswer key to check his work. Then he writes each incorrect sentence, altering the predicate to make the sentence correct.


Words That Crunch



L.2.2c



Use an apostrophe to form contractions.

idea art
idea art




To prepare this hands-on center, set out a bowl of alphabet cereal, several paper strips, and glue. A student uses the cereal to spell a contraction on a paper strip and then glues the pieces down. To make the apostrophe, she glues a broken cereal piece between the two letters that form the contraction. The child shows the meaning of the contraction by writing on the strip the two words that form it. She makes more contractions as time allows.