Main-Idea Mobiles from Mailbox
RI.3.2
Determine the main idea of a text; recount key details.
Help students get the hang of main idea and supporting details! In advance, copy a nonfiction paragraph that correlates with a unit of study. Underline the paragraph's main idea and then place it at a center with 6" x 18" construction paper strips, crayons, a hole puncher, and yarn. A child reads the paragraph, looking for the supporting details. Next, he folds a strip into fourths, labeling the bottom of the first section with the main idea and the remaining sections with supporting details. He illustrates each section; then he punches two holes at the top. Finally, he feeds a length of yarn through the holes and ties a knot.



Spin and Find
RI.2.5
Know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text.
RI.3.5
Use text features to locate information relevant to a given topic.


Challenge students to identify elements of informational text with this small-group activity. To prepare a spinner, divide a paper plate into six equal sections and label each section with a different nonfiction text feature. After reading a common selection, have each student, in turn, use a pencil and a paper clip to spin the spinner. Direct the child to read aloud the text feature spun; then have her locate in the selection an example of the text feature. When she finds it, she says the corresponding page number and waits for the rest of the group to turn to that page. Then the student guides the rest of the group to touch the example and repeat its text feature name. For an added challenge, set a timer and encourage the group to complete the activity in a predetermined length of time.

File Not Found
File Not Found
Reading Comprehension


http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2012/11/mobile-learning-and-common-core.html#.UKTrnYfAd0a Free Tech Tools to meet Common Core

http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-smusd/


I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas
I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas
external image 121012_hippo_title.gif

What would a little girl do if she were to unwrap a hippopotamus on Christmas morning? This charmingly illustrated version of the song by the same name is sure to delight young readers and get everyone in the holiday spirit!Explain to students that the song “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” became famous in 1953. Ten-year-old Gayla Peevey sang the song to raise money for the Oklahoma City Zoo. The zoo wanted to buy a hippo.Next, guide each student to choose an animal or object he thinks a nearby zoo should buy. Lead the child to brainstorm three reasons the zoo should make the purchase. Then have the student use his list to write a persuasive letter to the zoo. If desired, have the child glue wrapping paper to the back of his letter and then fold it, as shown, into a festive envelope.
Celebrate Hanukkah
Celebrate Hanukkah
I Have a Little Dreidel
I Have a Little Dreidel


Photographs show children from around the world participating in Hanukkah traditions. A recipe, a glossary, and additional information are included at the back of the book.For this center, program a card as shown. Place the card at a center along with the book, sticky notes, and lined paper. Each pair of students chooses a picture from the book. The partners follow the card’s directions, answering the questions and writing a caption for the picture. The duo writes its caption on a sticky note and sticks it to the picture. Once each pair of students has captioned a different picture, share with the class each picture and its new caption.
idea
idea




Powers of Persuasion
Writing opinion pieces, supporting a point of view
with reasons and information
File Not Found
File Not Found


The Giving Tree
The Giving Tree
The Giving Tree
The Giving Tree


This timeless tale follows the life of a tree that loves a boy and gives him everything she can even while the boy thinks only of himself.
Place a copy of the book, red construction paper, scissors, and markers at a center. Have each student cut out six apple shapes, reread the story, and identify six main events. Next, the child writes on each shape a different story event. Then he refers to the apples as he retells the story to a partner.
idea
idea


book cover
book cover
A Light in the Attic
A Light in the Attic


Captivate your students with the silly characters, thought-provoking predicaments, and humorous sketches in this poetic treasure.
For this partner activity, have each duo choose a poem about an interesting character (see the list). Then guide the partners to study the poem and list on index cards traits that describe the main character. Next, the pair draws and cuts out an illustration of the character. On a sentence strip, the partners record the poem’s title and the character’s name. Then the twosome staples its drawing and index cards to the sentence strip. Finally, the pair shares its work, pointing out text evidence from the poem, and then posts its work on a board titled “Extraordinary Characters From A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein.”
external image 040113_attic_list.gif
idea
idea




Winter: An Alphabet Acrostic
Winter: An Alphabet Acrostic
Winter: An Alphabet Acrostic
Winter: An Alphabet Acrostic





Whether you and your students are hoping for snow or already anticipating spring's warmth, you are sure to enjoy this collection of wintry descriptions from A to Z.
With this writing activity, students move from reading sensory descriptions to writing them. Assign each student one of the winter activities listed below. Then each child brainstorms three sensory details about her topic and drafts an "I" statement about each detail. After revising her sentences, the youngster copies each sentence onto a construction paper cutout of her wintry item. Each student shares her work before adding it to a bulletin board titled "Wintry Descriptions."


• drinking hot chocolate

• building a snowman

• catching snowflakes on my tongue

• shoveling snow

• snuggling under a blanket

• playing a game inside where it is warm
idea
idea

spacer
spacer

A Bad Case of Stripes
A Bad Case of Stripes
idea title
idea title


Camilla Cream loves lima beans, but she doesn't want anyone to know. This fanciful story with its be-true-to-yourself theme is vocabulary rich and beautifully illustrated.Before reading, cut construction paper sheets into 3" x 12" strips to make five different-colored strips for each student. Next, have each child staple his strips together. Then read the book's first page aloud and pause. Guide each student to think about what might happen next and write his prediction on the first strip. Continue reading. If the student's prediction is confirmed, he marks a check on the strip. If the child must reject his prediction, he marks an X. Pause four more times as guided to the right, having students make predictions each time. At the end of the story, pair students to review and discuss their predictions.
idea
idea



Mister and Me
Mister and Me
idea title
idea title


Jolene, Momma, and Grandpa have an ideal family—according to Jolene. But when Mr. Leroy Redfield shows an interest in her widowed mother, Jolene knows that things are about to change! As Jolene tries to get Mister out of their lives with her devilish stunts, Mister works toward softening Jolene's hardened heart.Students will dance with the story's details as they complete this main idea activity! Begin by giving each student the listed materials. Guide her through the provided steps to create a booklet. Before reading the first chapter, ask students to focus on what the chapter is mainly about. Upon the chapter's end, have students discuss the events and details of the chapter. Next, challenge each student to create a title for the chapter based on the class discussion and write it on the corresponding page of her booklet. Then instruct her to write two or three details that support her title. Continue this process with the remaining chapters of the book.Materials: 9" x 12" sheet of black construction paper, 6 sheets of unlined paper, white crayon, scissors, access to a staplerSteps:1. Stack the unlined paper on top of the black paper. Fold the stack in half so that the black paper is on the outside. Staple along the fold to secure.2. Draw and cut out a shoe shape placing the top of the shoe at the fold as shown.3. Label the top of each page with a different chapter number from the book (1–12).4. Use a white crayon to write the title “Dancing With Details” on the booklet cover.


book cover
book cover
Oddhopper Opera
Oddhopper Opera


An array of bugs and other creatures roam through this colorful assortment of rhymes and shape poems. More charming than alarming, these creepy, crawly verses are sure to keep readers entertained.
After reading, lead students to list words, phrases, and interjections they might use to describe the garden. Then guide each child to use the list to write five poetic phrases that describe the garden. To finish her poem, the child chooses an interjection that sums up her impressions of the garden. Next, the child makes six leaf-shaped construction paper cutouts, copies each line of her poem onto a separate leaf, and glues the leaves together to make a unique plant. Then she adds details with scrap paper and other craft materials.
idea
idea